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Bicycling.com – Featuring Momentum 34 – September 2012

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TrailSpace.com – Featuring Atmos 65 – September 19, 2012

September 19, 2012

I have an Arc’teryx Bora 95 for long hauls, so I’m used to quality and good fit. The Atmos amazed me. It was SO light, and I don’t know WHAT it did with the weight … but … I was literally jumping up an down on the trail (I have a Marmot Swallow, so my tent has a chunk of base weight to begin with).

I read reviews of both the Arc’teryx Bora and the Osprey AFTER I bought the Osprey. I have been spoiled in my choice of both. The statement on Osprey that they lead the way, set the standards for other packs, is well noted.  I looked at a Gregory as well as some EMS ones … the Osprey was awesome by comparison even in the store.  I cautiously kept sales receipts and such for until I loaded and tested it … this one WON’T be returned.

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YMMVReviews.com – Featuring Syncro 15 – September 2012

September 18, 2012

YMMV Review

Everyone out there probably knows who Osprey is. They are one of the large pack manufacturers with a range of packs varying from urban to the backcountry and much in between. Over the last couple of years, they have been focusing more on their Hydration line and in 2012, they introduced the Syncro collection. This collection is made up of three packs varying from 10 to 20 liters in size. I worked with Osprey to test the middle one, the Syncro 15 Pack.

Testing

The Syncro Series of packs are a multi use hydration series aimed first at cyclists and then hiking and other activities. I tested the Syncro 15 mainly on the bike but also took it out on the trail and even used it commuting. For my rides, they varied from 15 to 100 miles in a variety of temperatures. As I tested the pack through the summer, I did not have any real rain to deal with, lucky me!

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Gorp.com – Featuring SS13 Hydraulics and SS13 Reservoir – September 2012

September 18, 2012

Just when we think that you can’t improve on something, Osprey announces a cache of significant enhancements to their existing hydration reservoir—already one of the best on the market. As with the current models, the new bladders will retain the rigid plastic strip that makes it easy to grasp and refill, and allows the bladder to keep its form when it’s empty. The new design will also have a BPA- and PVC-free film that’s resilient and tasteless, a three-quarter turn cap for faster and more secure access, and a direct-welded plate to provide a wide, low profile. The hose diameter has been expanded to a quarter-inch for faster water flow, a countered back plate will improve on-trail comfort, and all models will include a magnetic bite valve that attaches to the Osprey pack’s sternum strap.

This spring Osprey will also unveil two new women-specific packs and update the women’s Verve and the men’s Manta, Raptor, and Viper packs. We’re particularly intrigued by the new Raven pack, the femme equivalent to the mountain bike-specific Raptor. Tailored to a woman’s body it’ll have a breathable back panel, a flexible harness and hip belt, a three-liter reservoir, their signature helmet strap, and a massive kangaroo pouch for layers. It’ll come in three sizes, starting at $109.

The packs and new reservoir will be ready this spring.

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SkiNet.com – Featuring Ozone Series – September 17, 2012

September 17, 2012

If the mere thought of lugging a giant duffel bag through the airport makes your back hurt and the idea of paying baggage overage charges causes you the same pain, you might think about investing in a new rolling bag, the Osprey Ozone. Ozone series bags are light—under five pounds for the 80 liter bag, 4 pounds for the 36 and 46 liter bags. Osprey stripped out excess frame material but didn’t compromise strength, quality or the organizational features that are essential for skiers.

The lightweight HighRoad LT Chassis is Osprey’s special sauce. It’s an ultra-durable injection molded (and high clearance) base bolstered by large, sealed bearing polyurethane wheels, and an aluminum frame. Sealed wheels means that moisture, road sand and salt can’t work their way in and cause the wheels to lock up. High clearance means no dragging on rough terrain, over door jams, etc.

And the bags have loads of space. A yawning main compartment with three large zippered pockets means you can find anything in a jiffy, even the stuff stashed way at the bottom. A large zippered pocket on the back is roomy enough to hold several issues of Ski Magazine—for your in-flight reading pleasure—with a smaller zippered pocket for the small stuff. It also has two vertical stuff pockets on the front big enough to shove in a light jacket or the gloves you don’t want to lose on the plane. And a zippered top pocket holds toiletries, snacks, or other items you need to get to quickly.

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TheActiveTimes.com – Featuring Mutant 38 – September 2012

September 15, 2012

We’ve chosen five packs in the 30- to 40-liter range that exemplify the discerning packer’s wants and needs. All packs are hydration compatible, with a comfortable carrying range between 20 and 40 lbs. Whether you’re bagging a technical peak or hiking to the top of the nearest tree-free knoll, these packs keep it simple.

Osprey Mutant 38 This pack has an ultra-clean design with full technical features, a thermoformed contoured back panel for enhanced, day-long comfort, and a removable bivy pad that doubles for a lunch seat.

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OutsideOnline.com – Featuring Poco Premium – September 13, 2012

September 13, 2012

Several features set the top-of-the-line Poco apart from its rivals: One, no question the “Fit on the Fly” hip belt adjuster was the easiest and fastest to cinch down and size to my waist. At its smallest setting, it fit me snugly, with no extra room for rubbing. Two, it has the most ample, sun-and-rain cover. Pre-attached, it unzips from its sleeve and pulls forward to attach via clips to the side of the shoulder straps. Three, the zip-off daypack compartment is ideal for shorter outings when you need less gear. No need to haul the extra weight; simply unzip and go. There’s still a cavernous lower compartment for diapers (changing pad included), snacks, and a change of clothes. Better yet, when your child wants to walk, the low-profile daypack can become your child’s “practice” pack. When they get tired, just zip it back on. Four, stirrups. Yup, this ride sports a pair of nylon stirrups that keeps tired little legs from dangling (and, as we discovered on a hike up New Mexico’s 12,200-foot Deception Peak, lets them play “horse”). Other niceties: A hidden hydration slot holds a bladder, and the child’s harness was the easiest of the batch to attach; ample padding keeps the strap from disappearing into the cockpit, so no more rooting around for tangled shoulder straps. True to Osprey’s pack-building pedigree, the Poco has no fewer than seven smaller pockets, both mesh and zippered, including a small one sized for a cell phone or pacifier on the chest straps.

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BikeShopGirl.com – Featuring Raven Series and Verve Series – September 13, 2012

September 13, 2012

The Raven series is the new sister to Osprey’s Raptor collection of premium, mountain biking, hydration packs. Sized and tailored for a woman’s body, the Raven builds on the reputation for outstanding fit and stability established with the Raptor line. Highly detailed and uniquely designed, these packs will turn a lot of heads while tearing up the trail.



We have been reviewing the 2012 Verve pack and excited to see some of the changes as it seems to make the bag a bit more functional for rides the girl looking for function (multi-tool, pump, food) and not a ton of water on their back (2-3L.)

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Babble.com – Featuring Poco – September 12, 2012

September 12, 2012

The Osprey carriers are for serious hikers and outdoorsy families that need their baby to keep up with their active lives. And babies would be more than happy to ride along in this cushiony “cockpit,” as Osprey calls it, while you lug around your water, snacks, and travel gear in the surrounding pockets. This carrier is extremely adjustable and versatile — think of it like a structured backpack that also happens to hold your kid — and their “Plus” and “Premium” models have extra features like a built-in sunshade, detachable daypack, and included changing pad. But my favorite features are the built-in feet stirrups — perfect for older toddlers — and the adjustable torso length — perfect for extra petite or extra tall hikers.

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