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OutsideOnline.com – The Gear Guy – Featuring Kestral 38 – April 13, 2011

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OutsideOnline.com – The Gear Guy – Featuring Kestral 38 – April 13, 2011

April 27, 2011

I am looking for a solid pack that is large enough for a bivy, a 32- to 45-degree down sleeping bag, an inflatable pad, and food for a night stay. But I also want to minimalistic. There are so many choices. Any suggestions? What should I be looking for?

A great example would be the Osprey Kestrel 38 ($139). It has 2,300 cubic inches of capacity, plus adequate external stowage for poles, a jacket, that sort of thing. It’s a simple top-loader with a fixed flap/pocket, so you can’t over-fill it much. But you should be fine. And its suspension will take pretty substantial loads, as it has an internal steel frame that gives it structure and transfers weight to the hip belt.

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Outside Online.com Features Osprey Packs – December 4, 2010

December 13, 2010

While you maybe able to get away with work gloves, the same is not true for packs, whether you just want to take lunch and spare goggles or hit up backcountry laps, it’s an item that needs to be perfect to you and for the task. Which is why after a few years of dealing with less than perfect packs for me, I’ve returned to Osprey Packs,whose main focus is fit and options.

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OutsideOnline.com Gear Girl – Featuring Osprey Shuttle 32 – Jul 28, 2010

August 18, 2010

I hold the bar high for luggage. There’s nothing that peeves me more than retrieving my roller duffle at the baggage claim only to find that it’s been through the ninth circle of hell, with abrasions, broken zippers, missing snaps, and ugly black scrapes to prove it.

But there’s hope in the form of Osprey’s new Shuttle 32 ($279; ospreypacks.com). Built around Osprey’s “High Road” Chassis, which is made from an aluminum frame with molded high-impact plastic, the 110-liter, 1,600 cubic-inch ballistic polyester bag is designed for hard-core wear and tear, like a sand-infused island vacation. If you carry a lot of baggage like me (yes, I’ve been known to haul around ten-pound hardcover reference books), you’ll appreciate the bag’s straightjacket-like compression straps and top zippered pocket for those last-minute items, like underwear, you forgot to pack. The two large compartments separated by a bellows divider will keep your wet suits and sandy flip-flops separate from your clean clothes. The main compartment has a lockable zipper and there are four grab loops, plus XL wheels, which make hauling this haul bag a dream.

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Outside Online – The Best Summer Hydration Packs – Featuring Raptor 6 – July 7, 2010

July 27, 2010

Osprey Raptor 6: The Osprey Raptor 6 just looks badass, and let’s admit it, that’s half the fun. Streamlined, and more durable than the rest of the systems I tested, the Raptor 6 boasts a clever magnetic clip to keep the 180-degree bite valve in place, as well as sleeves for bike tools and room for a shell. While I found the Raptor 6 a bit sturdy for trail running, it was perfect for hiking and tearing up the singletrack on a mountain bike. Brownie Points: I left the Raptor 6 in a hot car for 24 hours and was surprised to find the two-liter reservoir had kept my water as ice cold as when I had filled it.


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Outsideonline.com – The Gear Guy – Featuring The Osprey Stratos 24 – June 16, 2010

July 8, 2010

Q: I’m searching for a great multi-purpose backpack for graduate school. I’d like to use it while biking to carry my laptop, books, and some dog accessories. In addition, I’d love to be able to throw a bladder in there along with some hiking gear. Any suggestions for me as to what route to go for a super sweet new pack?

A: … On the more backpack-y side of things, there is the Osprey Stratos 24 ($99). Same size as the REI pack, but a little less streamlined as it’s mean to be carried while walking. But you can use it on a bike. It’ll take a hydration bladder, it carries great, and its design gives you easy access to the stuff you need.

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