GearInstitute.com – Featuring Escapist 30 – January 2013 – Osprey Packs Press
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GearInstitute.com – Featuring Escapist 30 – January 2013

The Escapist 30 is the larger of Osprey’s line of multi-use packs with some features that make it attractive for longer mountain biking trips. The pack has Osprey’s usual diligent construction and abundant nice touches. It worked well enough for hiking, and it would be a great choice for long backcountry bike rides where you’re carrying a lot of gear.

Construction

The Escapist takes on a number of ideas and features from other packs in Osprey’s line, like adjustable-for-length suspension (discussed farther down). The zipper pulls and bayonet clips are light and hand-friendly. The main compartment has a zip-away divider to either help organize gear or open the entire compartment for bulky loading. There’s a semi-circular access zipper for easy access to the lower part of the pack. If you carry a large DSLR camera, the lower main compartment would be a good place to stash that gear.

Design

The pack has a lot of compartments and pockets. A well-designed external compartment allows for easy insertion and removal of your reservoir. A compartment on the front panel takes all kind of smaller gear – it’s especially nice for bike tools and inner tubes. There’s a small pocket on the top with soft padding for your shades, electronics and things like that. Compression straps trim the pack down when it isn’t stuffed. Three mesh pockets – two on the sides and one on the front – can catch small water bottles and other miscellaneous items. (…)

The Verdict

Osprey promotes the Escapist for long mountain biking trips as well as general day pack use, and it would be well worth a look if you’re going on a bike trip where you want to carry a lot of stuff or some overnight mountain bike hut touring. The pack’s overall organization has some real bike-friendly features – plenty of pockets for tools, reflective detailing, light clip points, and a nice helmet attachment system so that you don’t have to wear your helmet in the brewpub.

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