Osprey Packs Press – Page 102 – Media Hits & News relating to Osprey Packs and our great products!
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Popular Mechanics – Featuring Raptor 14 – July/August 2013

Osprey Press

BikeRadar.com – Featuring Manta 20 – July 5, 2013

July 5, 2013

While the 20 litres of storage space makes it overkill for your average trail centre spin, if you’re preparing to head further off the beaten track then this multi-use pack is comfortable, versatile and adaptable.

We really love the Airspeed back, which uses a sprung mesh panel to evenly distribute weight without any hot spots, and allows plenty of airflow. The well-designed waistband also helps to keep weight on the hips, preventing back pain even when the pack is fully loaded.

Two wide and long zipped waist pockets give quick access and loads of storage, but people with particularly skinny waists might struggle to tighten it down sufficiently. The straps are a similarly light, comfortable and well-vented mix of mesh and foam; neat guides keep excess straps under control.

There’s a separate compartment for an up-to-3L bladder, though you don’t get one with the pack. Osprey’s own redesigned, rigid-backed Hydraulics 3L bladder is an excellent match, though, and resists the tendency some bladders have of turning into an unmanageable sausage at maximum capacity. The magnetic bite valve holder is a great party trick too.

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Backpacker.com – Featuring Volt 75 and Viva 65 – June 4, 2013

July 4, 2013

“This pack has penthouse features at a basement price,” said one tester after a four-day trip in Big Bend National Park. “Effective compression keeps the load compact and stable for quick overnights, but a seemingly bottomless packbag can handle gear and food for a week.” Another tester toted the Viva 65 (the women’s version) on a five-day loop in Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Park. “The pack is light for its class, yet the features are perfect,” she says, pointing to stretchy side and stuff-it pouches, the bottom zipper, and the giant top lid, all of which make for easy organization. Our testers carried 60-pound loads with no soreness, thanks to the wire perimeter frame and plastic framesheet that effectively transfer weight to the precurved, dense foam hipbelt.

The secret to big-pack performance at such a small price and low weight? Designers skipped pricey features found on many Osprey models—like a built-in raincover, multiple sizes, and interchangeable suspension parts—and focused on comfort and durability. “It came through abusive canyon scrambles unscathed,” reports one tester, referring to the 600-denier poly packbag. The exterior hydration sleeve lets you access the bladder without unpacking. And the suspension system adjusts (via a Velcro patch) from 17 to 22 inches with no decrease in stability.

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Trailspace.com – Featuring Viva 50 – July 3, 2013

July 3, 2013

The Viva series is advertised as being without all the bells and whistles but I would argue that it is chocked full of features which, for the most part, increase functionality but do not add significantly to the weight. An ultra-lightweight it is not, but at 3 lbs., 8 oz., it’s a respectably light pack with a high level of comfort and durability.

Attention to small details in functionality will delight users and help make this pack a top choice; though, the ease-of-adjustability features found in the Viva series may not be as strong of a selling point for everyone. In addition to being suitable for a wide range of women’s figures, I would recommend the Viva for multi-user situations or as a child/teenager’s pack, as it has the ability to grow as they do.

Pros

  • External hydration compartment
  • Good fit/comfort for women
  • Hipbelt pockets and stretchy mesh pockets
  • Ergonomic zipper pulls, hip belt tensioning design, and many other small but functional details

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Appalachia & Beyond – Featuring Poco Plus – July 1, 2013

July 1, 2013

Before our Dinah Bug came along, we were hiking mad. We almost covered 100 miles the year before Bug was born. While Robin was pregnant, we covered some good miles up until the third trimester. After she was born, our time on the trail was practically non-existent. How do you hike with an infant. Our answer was, you don’t, especially in the winter. After the six month mark though we were getting the itch to get back on the trail. To be honest, we had the itch for much longer, but we didn’t want anything happening to Bug and we didn’t have a real good carrier to take her on the trail with.

Enter the Osprey Poco Plus kid carrier pack. This was the answer we were looking for to get us back on the trails even though it we knew it would be at our former intensity. We knew 6+ miles were out of the question for now. Neither of us had ever hiked with a wee little one in tote. You may be asking, what about Kiddo? Well I didn’t have her out on the trail until she was 3 and that was very shortly after I started to get into hiking, and before I met Robin, so needless to say I was very green, but I digress.

We received the Osprey Poco Plus and it was like manna from heaven. We were dying to give it a test run. We took Boo out on one of her first hikes in it at Norris Dam State Park and did approximately 2 miles on the Marine Railway Loop trail. The Poco was wonderful. It has plenty of space to store Boo’s essentials (Diapers, wipes, blanket to use to change her on, bottles, snacks, water cuppies, toys, etc.). It also has plenty of space to store other essentials for hiking in general as well as a change of clothes for Boo if needed and a jacket for the both of us.

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BikeMag.com – Featuring Zealot 16 – June 30, 2013

June 30, 2013

Thirty-eight years in the trade have clearly taught the designers at Osprey a thing or two about making packs, because the Zealot 16—their 976-cubic-inch dump truck of a hydration pack—is the king of comfort. Go ahead, load the Zealot with 100 ounces of water, body armor, a full-face helmet, tools and any other creature comforts—the one thing you won’t feel is a pain in the back.

Though Osprey packs are no longer hand-made in the U.S.A., its quality control is remarkably stringent: The company’s founder and owner spends months out of every year at the factory in Vietnam to ensure that
design and production standards are kept high.

The results are evident. Consider the clever weight-distributing straps, low-profile reservoir, well-ventilated shoulder harness and ridge-molded back panel. No hot spots or aching shoulders from wearing this pack. The Zealot is also loaded with useful features, including the LidLock helmet clip—which fastens XC helmets to the outside of the pack—a removable, rollout tool pouch, a smart-phone/music-player pocket on the left shoulder strap and a magnet built into the sternum strap that secures the reservoir hose and keeps the bite valve within easy reach. The rigid-framed reservoir was also a breeze to fill and insert into a fully loaded pack.

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BikeMag.com – Featuring Zealot 16 – June 30, 2013

June 30, 2013

Thirty-eight years in the trade have clearly taught the designers at Osprey a thing or two about making packs, because the Zealot 16—their 976-cubic-inch dump truck of a hydration pack—is the king of comfort. Go ahead, load the Zealot with 100 ounces of water, body armor, a full-face helmet, tools and any other creature comforts—the one thing you won’t feel is a pain in the back.

Though Osprey packs are no longer hand-made in the U.S.A., its quality control is remarkably stringent: The company’s founder and owner spends months out of every year at the factory in Vietnam to ensure that

design and production standards are kept high.

The results are evident. Consider the clever weight-distributing straps, low-profile reservoir, well-ventilated shoulder harness and ridge-molded back panel. No hot spots or aching shoulders from wearing this pack. The Zealot is also loaded with useful features, including the LidLock helmet clip—which fastens XC helmets to the outside of the pack—a removable, rollout tool pouch, a smart-phone/music-player pocket on the left shoulder strap and a magnet built into the sternum strap that secures the reservoir hose and keeps the bite valve within easy reach. The rigid-framed reservoir was also a breeze to fill and insert into a fully loaded pack.

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