Osprey Packs Press – Page 137 – Media Hits & News relating to Osprey Packs and our great products!
Poco AG Safety Notice
UtahOutside.com – Featuring Escapist 30 – May 29, 2012

Osprey Press

UtahOutside.com – Featuring Escapist 30 – May 29, 2012

May 29, 2012

The gear trend these days has been about the “one quiver.” You know, that gear that can do it all, every day? We’ve got one-quiver skis, one-quiver bikes, one-quiver shoes, and even one-quiver backpacks. Well if you’re in the market for a one-quiver pack, then rest your trail-weary eyes on the Osprey Escapist 30 hydration pack.

The Osprey Escapist 30 is part of Osprey’s mountain biking pack line, and has all the features you’d want for that. But strap this to your back, and you’ll find that it’s also ideal for long day hikes, adventure racing, or even carrying your text books across campus. It’s a true one-quiver piece of gear, but born from the womb of mountain biking. As such, I took the Escapist out on all of my mountain bike rides in Utah and Colorado this spring and put it to the test.

The first thing I noticed when I pulled the Escapist out of the box is that it’s a true Osprey, built with all the features that make us love their packs. Features like the AirScape ventilated backpanel, BioStretch harness, and LidLock bike helmet attachment are all there. But as far as bike-specific packs are concerned, the Escapist 30 goes beyond by literally “packing” everything you could want inside. There’s huge main compartments that fit whatever you’d need to pack for a long day in the saddle or multi-day bike packing trips. There’s also internal organizer pockets for bike tools that keeps things like pumps, chain tools and tire levers right where you need them for when you need them.

Read Full Post
Download PDF

TheBigOutside.com – Featuring Jib 35 – May 28, 2012

May 28, 2012

There were two things I made sure of before letting my son carry a backpack instead of a daypack on our family backpacking trips: that he was ready and eager to do it, and that the pack I gave him fit him. The first question I let him answer: I waited until he asked to carry a backpack. (He was nine-and-a-half the first time. Now 11, he has carried a backpack on several trips. My daughter is nine and yet to carry more than a daypack, though I think she’s close to making the decision on her own.) The second question I answered by measuring his torso properly and trying packs on him. Many kids are not big enough to fit in a children’s backpack until age nine or 10—and carrying a poorly fitting pack might be the best way to turn a kid off to backpacking. My son has used and likes both the Fox 40 (skiing to a backcountry yurt in Idaho’s Boise Mountains) and the Jib 35 (backpacking in Utah’s Capitol Reef National Park), carrying 18 pounds in each pack. The 11-year-old daughter of friends also carried the Jib on our yurt trip. I think both are excellent kid backpacks, though they have different strengths.

The Fox 40 fits the smallest kids best, and has a little more padding in its hipbelt, shoulder straps, and back than the Jib 35, as well as having a nice vertical channel through the back padding for air circulation on hot days. I think it’s made to handle at least 20 pounds. But the Jib delivers a bit more support and rigidity, with its frame of aluminum rods and flexible tensioners in the hipbelt, giving it a slight advantage when your kid starts carrying upwards of 25 pounds. The Jib’s hipbelt is also adjustable for a wider range of waist and hip sizes—it can grow with your child. As for organization and features: Both are top-loaders with roomy lid pockets, deep, stretchy side pockets, and a safety whistle on the sternum strap; but the similarities end there. The Fox 40’s large, zippered, bellows side pockets (above the stretch pockets) have a functionality edge over the Jib’s front stuff-it pocket. But the Jib’s two zippered hipbelt pockets—big enough for a few snack bars each—are more useful for backpacking than the Fox’s hipbelt gear loops. Lastly, both are well-constructed packs built to last, with high-quality stitching and tough, 420-denier nylon, though the Jib’s mesh side and front pockets are more susceptible to tearing than any fabric on the Fox’s exterior.

Read Full Post
Download PDF

EpicMoms.com – Featuring Poco Premium – May 26, 2012

May 26, 2012

Summer vacation is easy to pack for, right? It’s flip-flops, sundresses, and…oh wait. When you’re going to the mountains, the weather can swing from blazing hot to frosty cold. Plus, unlike the beach, there are tons more activities—which means needing tons more gear.

Here’s how to pack wisely so you and your kids enjoy your high altitude getaway.

Transport

You won’t want to head home when you’re hiking with your toddler in the new Osprey Poco Premium ($299). This high-end kid carrier can carry up to 48 pounds and brings the storied pack company’s lightweight frame system to the kid carrier category. Until now, Deuter dominated the market with its Kid Comfort series, and those are great. But I love the integrated shade in the Poco and the kids’ harness, which is less like that of a carseat harness and more like a backpack. Plus the zip off backpack and the ample storage are supremely useful.

Read Full Post
Download PDF

NationalGeographic.com – Featuring Atmos 50 – May 2012

May 21, 2012

One of Osprey’s best loved backpacks, the Atmos 50, has been redesigned around an infinitely adjustable suspension system that lets you perfectly customize the fit and feel of this top-loading, 50-liter weekender. Even on the trail, you can quickly adapt the torso length and adjust how the load carries. The new waist belt is changeable too. There’s an extra layer of foam that slides between the hips and belly button. Slide it back if you want more padding on the hip bones, forward for more cushion in front. Osprey says you can expect the three-pounder to carry up to 40 to 45 pounds comfortably, but that seems overly generous. Plan on 35 and your shoulders will thank you.

Get It: $199; www.ospreypacks.com

Read Full Post
Download PDF

ResourcefulMommy.com – Featuring Poco Plus – May 18, 2012

May 18, 2012

Today’s featured giveaway has been provided by Osprey. Osprey Packs, a leader in creating top-quality, high-performance, innovative packs to comfortably and efficiently carry gear, introduces the Poco Series of child carriers. The Poco Series channels everything the brand knows about packs into a line of child carriers that are comfortable, safe, supportive, light, well ventilated and supremely easy to adjust for fit. Superb ventilation as well as quick and easy torso and hipbelt adjustment were important factors in the design of the Poco series from the outset. Ventilation is the key to comfort for both parent and child and ability to quickly adjust the pack between parents ensures the comfortable fit expected from an Osprey.

Enter to Win

One Resourceful Mommy reader will receive the Osprey Poco Plus (ARV: $259). The Poco Plus features a built-in sunshade, size adjustable hipbelt with zippered pockets, a large zippered lower compartment, inner mesh security pocket, two stretch mesh side pockets and a cell phone pocket on the shoulder strap.

Read Full Post
Download PDF

SkiNet.com – Featuring Zealot – May 16, 2012

May 16, 2012

Our office is full of mountain bike enthusiasts who are all too happy to watch the last patches of snow melt off the trails. Right about now, they’re as giddy as we see them all year, thanks in large part to the weekly staff rides that started up a few weeks ago. We asked the staff-ride ringleader, fat-tire fanatic Tony Wilhelms what tools he carries to keep himself out of a pickle. Here they are. Don’t leave the trailhead without them:

Hydration Equipped Backpack: Osprey Zealot

When you’re two-wheeling downhill over rocks and ruts, a pack that bounces around or throws off your balance can be a crash waiting to happen. Osprey’s Zealot is designed specifically for mountain bikers; it has a slim design that keeps it centered and close to your body. As you’d expect, it includes a hydration reservoir and has separate sleeve with a drainage spout in case the bladder gets punctured or springs a leak. Pockets galore, sure, but it’s the placement not the quantity that won Tony over. A small pouch on the shoulder strap, for example, is a good place for him to stash and easily reach his energy snacks without missing a pedal stroke. And the piece de resistance? A magnetic interface between the drinking tube and the shoulder strap that keeps the tube from flapping in your face or out of reach. Conclusion: The Osprey design team spends plenty of time on the single track and knows what riders want.

Read Full Post
Download PDF

SuperStarBabies.com – Featuring Poco Plus – May 16, 2012

May 16, 2012

I have had the wonderful opportunity to review Osprey’s new Poco Plus child carrier. Living in the Pacific North West I feel the outdoors should be a large part of my children’s daily life, but my youngest that is ten months old is at the age where it’s hard to do anything with her. She can’t walk and only wants to crawl but she LOVES the outdoors. We have so many hiking trails on the Olympic Peninsula and a vast majority of them are not stroller accessible. Because of this I was doing some online research when I came across Osprey. It looked like a great product for the outdoor family.

(…)

The Poco Plus does not come with a day pack included but I didn’t even come close to needing it. I fit everything I needed into the large lower zippered lower compartment, diapers, wipes, snacks, camera, and changes of clothes.  The Poco Plus was very easy to adjust to get the correct comfort fit and was quickly readjusted when the carrier was switched between people. The carrier is surprisingly light at under 7 lbs, my 3 ½ yr old was able to wear it, and accommodates a maximum load of up to 48lbs.  My husband and I went on a 4 mile hike last weekend with our girls and were shocked how comfortable it was and how it didn’t cause any discomfort considering you had a child on your back. I wish I had known about this product when my oldest was younger and were living in Alaska, it would have been perfect! I also like that I can use the carrier for both my kids. My 3 yr old is quite petite at 25 lbs so she enjoyed it as well. It was almost a showdown with her and her sister because she thought she should be the one to ride in it. Comfort is a key factor when deciding to purchase a product such as this and it is not lacking in any area when it comes to comfort. It also has storage galore. More importantly the kids loved it and had smiles on their face the whole time. There truly is nothing worse than having a kid screaming in your ear for any length of time and that was never an issue.

Read Full Post
Download PDF