The Mystery and Magnetism of the Mountains: Ben Clark Runs Nolan’s 14 – Osprey Packs Experience
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The Mystery and Magnetism of the Mountains: Ben Clark Runs Nolan’s 14

The Mystery and Magnetism of the Mountains: Ben Clark Runs Nolan’s 14


Morning of September 1, 2015: Ben summits peak #1, Mt. Massive wearing his Osprey Rev 12

Osprey Athlete Ben Clark is in currently in the midst of the awe-inspiring feat of traversing Nolan’s 14. What is Nolan’s 14? 

“After 15 years in obscurity, Nolan’s 14, a hundred-mile traverse of 14 14,000-foot peaks in 60 hours, emerges as a new test piece for elite mountain runners.” –National Geographic Adventure

Yes, that’s correct — completing Nolan’s 14 entails traversing 14 summits, each over 14,000 ft (nearly 100 miles in distance!), in under 60 hours.

Ben shares what this particular group of 14 peaks means to him and how this traverse has shaped the last three years of his life:

In all my life, I have never been so prepared. But in all my life, I have never found the right sequence to complete this unending task, a three year commitment of endurance fitness topping 33 previous years of hard knocks and tussles with progress through the mountains. “Is this time different? Is it worth it?” I have to ask myself — this is the grandest journey on foot of my life — through them and through these years and it has taken longer than I ever thought. It has ground me down while building me up.  It is so long, so enormous.



The last two summers I have “gone for it” 4 times on ultra marathon distance traverses over 10 mountains in central Colorado, on a route known as Nolan’s 14. In that two years I have seen my hopes of finishing crushed more than 75 of 93 miles into it twice.

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Despite the setbacks along the way toward reaching an understanding of visiting all 14 of Nolan’s 14’s fourteen thousand foot summits in one push, its mystery and magnetism continue to compel me because I love the mountains and big days.  I have made mistakes out there but had a satisfying and safe time pursuing this adventure and don’t want to give up on my original purpose for engaging with the line in it’s totality. It’s the biggest effort I can reach for these days and I feel like is suited to the most focused strengths I have trained for and within reason.  Now that the time approaches for another long stretch, I’m happy to be exploring it on the best terms I can-those grounded on experience gained on the line and preparation refined each time.

My plan is to start at the north end of the trail and go in one long push from the Fish Hatchery in Leadville, Co. to the summit of Mount Shavano near Poncha Springs, Co. I’ll have no crew, but will have one pair of shoes, one pack (my Osprey Rev 12) and some pretty sweet food, enough gear to do all 14 of the fourteeners. I’m psyched about this. You might be wondering, how the hell is that possible if it took so much crew before to not finish?  It will, after all, be me alone.


And this brings me back to the point of this journey, to answer my own questions, to staying committed to a purpose, to answering “is this time different?”  No. This time is the same. I began my journey as a mountaineer in this same mountain range 16 years ago, before a decade committed to high altitude Himalayan exploration. In that time I lived many impressionable memories and shared moments with friends that indemnify a lifetime of happiness.  It is worth it to know the mountains, and also their uncertain moments.  I stopped taking physically consequential risks in the mountains when i became a father 3 years ago. I will always love the mountains and I wanted a safer way to explore them when pushing myself. Nolan’s 14 is for me, that path.

It is a return to my roots as a climber, I view it as the biggest climb in the world.  It is minimal and asks for a high level of concentration and accountability during the experience. I will need to be present and own the outcome of every decision for days on end…and nights.  I perform my best and truly enjoy the mountains when I have to do that. So many great friends helped me learn it is possible, only in the doing of this would we have known.

With 4 attempts already under my belt, the first 3 adhering to a set of pre existing conventions that led to 13 others completing sub 60 hour finishes on the line since 1999, and 6 since I first attempted it in 2013, I have learned a thing or two.  Organized more like a competitive event than a mountain traverse, those rules can lead to success if the timing is good.  But with so many opportunities to figure it out in that way specifically and still not completing it due to my own timing and logistical complications, I’ve had to forget those conventions and slowly develop my own personal style based on my experiences on it, what mountaineers would call our “fair means”.  The means is a simpler version of things than what I had been doing or what might normally be done.  Fewer things to line up means better chances, I believe, and still a whole lot of fun.  I hope to flow over it now and to just “surf the chaos” as a good friend would say. I’m excited about the start rather than coordinating a party of people. 🙂


Getting the rocks out of my shoe during the 22nd hour of my third 60 hour attempt of Nolan’s 14. Here I am at Elkhead Pass between the summits of Missouri Mt and Mt. Belford-2 of the 14 peaks over 14,000′ on the 93 mile line. Photo: Kendrick Callaway

I will do my best with what knowledge I have to “finish” with as little time on my feet as possible and per the schedule below, which is still below the 60 hour goal I have had previously. This is not implied to be a “solo” journey as there are many people climbing fourteeners every day of the week and being alone out there any time other than night would be rare, it is just an unsupported trip alone and based around the most ideal weather window.  I am heading out there to finish safely, under my own power with all my stuff on me and within a single push.  There are no guarantees, but if history is any indicator and the X factor I have been missing is present then I believe it’ll go!!!!


“Having fun, now it really starts!” September 1, 2015: Ben summits peak #2, Mt. Elbert

Join us in following Ben’s amazing journey:
Instagram: @bclarkmtn and @ospreypacks

Ben’s Projected Splits:

September 1, 2015:

  • 6:00 AM start Fish Hatchery Leadville
  • 9:10 AM Mt. Massive Summit
  • 1:15 PM Mt Elbert Summit
  • 3:30 PM La Plata Trailhead
  • 6:30 PM La Plata Summit
  • 9:00 PM Winfield

September 2, 2015:

  • 12:00 AM Huron Summit
  • 2:30 AM Clohesy Lake
  • 5:30 AM Missouri Summit
  • 7:30 AM Belford Summit
  • 9:00 AM Oxford Summit
  • 1:00PM Harvard Summit
  • 3:30 PM Columbia Summit
  • 5:30 PM  N. Cottonwood Creek
  • 8:30 PM  Yale Summit
  • 11:00 PM Colorado 344 road on CT

September 3, 2015:

  • 3:00 AM Princeton Summit
  • 5:00 AM Alpine
  • 8:30 AM Antero Summit
  • 11:30 AM Tabegauche
  • 1:00 PM Shavano Summit


About Ben Clark:

In 17 years of actively climbing, skiing, and now running-I hope I’m where I am supposed to be — great partners and theben_clark_osprey_packs_athlete mountains have pushed me. I have questioned my potential because of them and heard my own voice of reason.  I think that is something I expect from the mountains, there is a line I like to cross when I engage them creatively and physically.

Today I run long distances hoping to earn an understanding of yet another vexing chapter of climbing; endurance.  It is a safe and simple path.  An extension of the base I leveraged my youth to build. It is something I can do outside every day. I am happy trying. I am happy in the mountains.